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Where are the Sharks?

The Bay Foundation is assisting with California State University Long Beach’s Shark Lab, run by Dr. Chris Lowe, by providing them with three new acoustic receivers. The new receivers were placed in the northern part of Santa Monica Bay (Malibu Pier to Zuma Beach) to help inform research and the public about the movements and residency of tagged white sharks within the Bay. So far these receivers have detected one juvenile female white shark in mid-August that was initially tagged off central Baja California. These receivers are also detecting other tagged fish, like a Giant Black Seabass tagged off Catalina Island. The often overlooked shovelnose guitarfish has been detected, too. For more information, check out this recent Los Angeles Magazine piece.

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DRAFT EIR ANNOUNCEMENT: BALLONA WETLANDS ECOLOGICAL RESERVE

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife released the Draft Environmental Impact Statement / Draft Environmental Impact Report (Draft EIS/EIR) for the Ballona Wetlands Restoration Project on Monday, September 25, 2017 at the following website:  https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Regions/5/Ballona-EIR.  To view the Notice of Availability (NOA), click here.

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Safe Path for Mountain Lions

Humans and animals instinctually know what they consider ‘appealing’, and move in that direction. With The Bay Foundation’s help, creating that appeal is exactly what the Resource Conservation District of the Santa Monica Mountains (RCDSMM), and many project partners, hope to do for mountain lions so they may cross the 101 Freeway safely and easily, meet new mates and avoid the plight of the famed P22.

Since late October, TBF has been overseeing the construction and management of what will be a contiguous connection that will look like a creek and cue the mountain lion to use what is familiar to them as a migration corridor, leading them to the Liberty Canyon Road underpass to cross the 101 freeway safely. This is Phase 1 of “Liberty Canyon Wildlife Passage Improvements Project”.

The dry creek bed—which connects to the existing upstream and downstream creeks—is constructed of boulders and cobble river rocks, with 47 different types of native plants on both sides and some in the middle. TBF selected the plants, as well as managed the irrigation (using solely reclaimed water), and planting design. Plants range from oak and walnut trees to two types of willows and four types of sages.

Project founders and partners: RCDSMM, State of CA Wildlife Conservation Board, State of CA 2006 Clean Water Bond Act, National Park Service, MRCA, County of LA, CalTrans, TBF, Las Virgenes Municipal Water District, National Wildlife Federation, and the offices of Sen. Fran Pavley (ret.) and Assemblymember Richard Bloom.

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Stone Canyon Creek Restoration – 1/20/18

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Learning to Pilot our ROV, R2Deep2!

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