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Malibu Lagoon Analyzed Four Years After $6.6 Million Restoration

Malibu Times – June 15, 2017

From 2012-13, the Malibu Lagoon underwent a nine-month-long restoration process initiated by California State Parks. Twelve acres of wetland near the mouth of Malibu Creek were drained, wildlife was trapped and relocated, heavy equipment scooped out a thousand tons of trash and fill, channels and bridges were removed, banks were reshaped and native vegetation was replanted. The reconfigured lagoon netted two additional acres of wetlands.

Today, four years later, nonprofit The Bay Foundation is preparing to publish the fourth annual Malibu Lagoon Monitoring Report in July…

…“The sediments are flushing out with the tidal cycles when the lagoon is breached,” [TBF E.D. Tom Ford] said. “The restoration is working. It’s been a dynamic several years and it’s become a dynamic system. We’re very pleased with the results so far — it’s been a categorical success.”…READ MORE

Malibu Lagoon Project Shows Signs of Success

Malibu Surfside News – June 13, 2017

The Malibu Lagoon Restoration and Enhancement Project celebrated its fourth anniversary this spring. “We’re about to start our fifth year of monitoring, and everything is going well,” Santa Monica Bay Foundation Watershed Programs Manager Melodie Grubbs told the Malibu Surfside News.

Grubbs explained that the team that monitors and evaluates the physical, chemical and biological health of the lagoon is seeing positive trends that include increased water circulation and improved oxygen levels in the water.

Bay Foundation Executive Director Tom Ford explained that those findings are good news for the plants and animals that live in the lagoon….READ MORE

Santa Monica Beach Combats Rising Sea Levels with ‘Re-Wilding’ Program

Neighborhoods.com – May 24, 2017

After starting its coastal “re-wilding” project last year, the city of Santa Monica and The Bay Foundation have officially completed seeding for their Wild Beach Restoration Pilot Program. The program aims to restore approximately three acres of Santa Monica Beach’s north end, returning coastal plant and wildlife to the beach that have been eliminated, and protecting the beach from the effects of climate change.

The site still requires years of careful monitoring, but there has already been a noticeable difference in the ecosystem after the seeding of four types of California dune plant species….READ MORE

Santa Monica Beach Goes Wild

Santa Monica Daily Press – May 11, 2017

The Bay Foundation and the City have completed the Wild Beach Restoration Pilot Program along a section of local beach and officials hope the program will showcase environmental restoration in the area.

Dean Kubani, Chief Sustainability Officer for the City of Santa Monica has been excited for this pilot project since it began. “It is a great example of a multi-benefit project that has the potential to provide habitat for many beach species, allow the public to interact with a natural, living beach environment and will help safeguard against the impacts of climate induced sea level rise and storm surges,” said Kubani….READ MORE

Rare Snowy Plovers Return to Nest, Lay Eggs on Popular LA County Beaches

Daily Breeze – May 10, 2017

For the first time in 68 years, several pairs of an endangered shorebird have laid eggs in nests [including in Santa Monica] built in the sand of three heavily visited beaches in Los Angeles County. [The nest at Santa Monica beach was destroyed by high winds.]

…Five months ago, the [Bay] Foundation created a garden-like restoration area on three acres of Santa Monica beach, planting some 40,000 native plant seedlings. About 10,000 sprouted, said Tom Ford, the foundation’s executive director.

…“This is a sign that, against all odds, western snowy plovers are making a comeback and we really need the cooperation of beachgoers to help give them the space they need to nest and raise their young,” he said in a statement….READ MORE

Bringing Back a Piece of the Wild

Los Angeles Times – May 10, 2017

On a popular beach that is groomed, sifted and devoid of vegetation, Santa Monica officials and a local environmental group are restoring three acres of sand to a more natural state.

The city and the Bay Foundation have fenced off a swath of shoreline, planted native species and taken steps to build up the beach in hopes of creating a buffer against sea level rise and bringing back coastal plants and wildlife that are almost gone from the region.

Already, dune hummocks have formed, and about 10,000 seedlings that include flowering sand verbena and beach evening primrose dot the beach enclosure….READ MORE

Rewilding Santa Monica’s Thoroughly Artificial Beach

KCET ‘Earth Focus’ – May 9, 2017

In the early 1900s, L.A. County beaches were not yet the tourist destination they would one day become. The pier in Santa Monica was completed in 1909, but it wasn’t for another few decades that the beach itself would itself become a destination.” At that time, Miami was the place to be, and this beach did not look like Miami,” says ecologist Tom Ford, Executive Director of the Santa Monica-based research and restoration nonprofit The Bay Foundation.

To draw more tourists to the area, local municipalities wanted the beaches of the Santa Monica Bay to mimic those on the nation’s opposite coast: bigger, flatter, wider. …A century later, Ford and his colleagues are working to fix those managers’ work.

…Santa Monica, like other coastal towns across the world, is trying to be proactive; to put processes in place now that could protect them from rising waters in the future. That’s where The Bay Foundation comes in….READ MORE

Efforts to Maintain the California Beach

LA 18 (KSCI-TV) Evening News – May 9, 2017

In order to help California to protect the beach resources, Santa Monica and the environmental organization Bay Foundation today launched a beach rehabilitation project, hoping to retain the golden beach of California by the power of nature. (Story is in Mandarin, English) …WATCH

Small, Threatened Shorebird Makes Comeback

Ventura County Star – May 9, 2017

A tiny, threatened shorebird that nests on sandy beaches made a small comeback this spring. For the first time in 70 years, western snowy plovers were found nesting on Los Angeles County beaches, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reported.

…The original Santa Monica State Beach nest was located in a restoration area there. Starting late last year, The Bay Foundation installed low-lying fencing and planted native seeds as part of a pilot program.

Melodie Grubbs, the organization’s watershed programs manager, saw snowy plovers in the area acting like they might be nesting in early April….READ MORE

‘Re-wilding’ a Santa Monica Beach to Protect Against Sea Level Rise

KPCC 89.3 – May 9, 2017

At the north end of Santa Monica Beach, there’s a fenced off 2-acre section that looks a bit unkempt. It’s an experiment in “re-wilding,” or restoring the beach to what it looked like before humans altered it. The pilot project, a partnership of The Bay Foundation and Santa Monica, could also help protect the city from sea level rise.

…”The theory is that the plants will help spark formation of little dunes, which we’re kind of seeing already,” said Bay Foundation Watershed Programs Manager Melodie Grubbs.

…Already, animals are taking notice. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found a threatened western snowy plover nest in the restoration plot last month, the first one discovered in L.A. County in more than 70 years. High winds destroyed the nest, but Chris Dellith, senior fish and wildlife biologist at the agency’s Ventura office, was still encouraged. “This is a sign that against all odds, western snowy plovers are making a comeback,” he said….READ MORE

UCLA Students Study Acidification of Kelp in Santa Monica Bay

UCLA Daily Bruin – April 28, 2017

One month ago, Ariel Pezner spent nine hours straight aboard a research vessel in the Santa Monica Bay, circulating the waves above an underwater kelp forest.

Pezner, a fourth-year environmental science student, is part of a six-person student team studying ocean acidification in a rehabilitated forest of kelp off the coast of Palos Verdes, California. This fall, the students began conducting and communicating their research in collaboration with The Bay Foundation as part of a practicum project through UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability….READ MORE

Clean Bay Certified Restaurants

Whole Life Times – April/May, 2017

If you live in or enjoy the beach cities in the Los Angeles area, making those beautiful ocean waters clean and safe is likely a priority. The Bay Foundation’s Clean Bay Restaurant Certification Program aims to keep it that way.

…The goal? To improve water quality by reducing stormwater runoff pollution generated by restaurants. Approximately 415 restaurants are currently certified in 11 participating cities, from the elegant The Strand House in Manhattan Beach to the casual Blaze Pizza in Culver City to the delicious and friendly Fast Taco in Santa Monica.  Certifying restaurants is important, because an average restaurant uses 300,000 gallons of water every year, and throws out 150,000 pounds of garbage….READ MORE

Calif. City Tries Shifting Sands Amid Disappearing Beaches

Next City – March 16, 2017

…In 1934, the same year that a New Deal program brought fitness equipment to what would become Muscle Beach, the city of Santa Monica installed an offshore breakwater that captured sediment and dramatically widened those beaches by hundreds of feet.

Today, with sea level rise and erosion threatening to eat away at the sandy expanses and damage city infrastructure, Santa Monica is testing a softer intervention. In a partnership with the nonprofit Bay Foundation, 3 acres of the beach’s north end have been seeded with native California dune plants. If the pilot works as planned, over time hummocks of sand will build up around them, providing natural protection to the parking lots, bath houses and homes inland….READ MORE