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Ballona Community Iceplant Removal Project

Activating restoration through the power of community.

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A Community-Based Iceplant Removal Project

The Bay Foundation (TBF), in partnership with California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW), Friends of Ballona Wetlands (FBW), and community volunteers, is conducting a project to remove invasive vegetation while broadening public involvement and stewardship at the Ballona Wetlands Ecological Reserve (Reserve).

The project focuses on the removal of iceplant and other non-native species to benefit native vegetation. Removing iceplant and other non-natives on-site will help protect remaining native flora and allow for planting and seeding that will be critical to the revegetation of the Reserve for the larger multi-year restoration effort. Pre- and post-restoration monitoring evaluate the progress of the project over time and will provide recommendations for additional community-level restoration opportunities on-site and at other similarly impacted urban wetland systems throughout Southern California.

Project Highlights

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Get Involved and Make a Difference

Hundreds of volunteers have contributed to this project’s success. To date, an estimated 34.5 tons of invasive iceplant have been removed. We need your continued support to revitalize the Reserve! Contact us to find out about volunteer opportunities, or explore upcoming volunteer events.

What Is Iceplant?

Iceplant is a creeping, mat-forming group of species that provides little protection or useable habitat for native birds and wildlife. Iceplant often forms dense monocultures that reduce biodiversity and displace native wetland species. The shallow, fibrous iceplant root network consumes large quantities of available water year-round, further impeding the growth of native species.

Benefits of Revitalization

The removal of dense iceplant stands, and the subsequent introduction of native wetland species, will provide an increase in the health and condition of the wetland habitats.  New vegetation will also increase native biodiversity and provide healthier habitat for several endangered species of special concern such as the Belding’s savannah sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis beldingi) and South Coast marsh vole (Microtus californicus stephensi).

Get Involved and Make a Difference

Hundreds of volunteers have contributed to this project’s success. To date, an estimated 34.5 tons of invasive iceplant have been removed. We need your continued support to revitalize the Reserve! Contact us to find out about volunteer opportunities, or explore upcoming volunteer events.

What Is Iceplant?

Iceplant is a creeping, mat-forming group of species that provides little protection or useable habitat for native birds and wildlife. Iceplant often forms dense monocultures that reduce biodiversity and displace native wetland species. The shallow, fibrous iceplant root network consumes large quantities of available water year-round, further impeding the growth of native species.

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